Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

A talk by Teresa Heffernan at the “Ethics of AI in Context” interdisciplinary workshop, September 17, 2019. The workshop was hosted by the Ethics of AI Lab, a project initiated by the University of Toronto’s Centre for Ethics.

A talk by Teresa Heffernan

ETHICS OF AI IN CONTEXT. A series of talks presented by the Ethics of AI Lab, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

4 – 6 PM, Tuesday, Sept 17, 2019. Room 200, Larkin Bldg., 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto

The era of “disruptive” technologies has given way to an ethical quagmire. Biased algorithms, invasive facial recognition software, proprietary black boxes, the theft and monetization of personal data, and the proliferation of hate-spewing bots and deepfakes have undermined democracy. Killer robots and the automation of war have led to a new arms raise with Vladimir Putin declaring whoever leads in AI will rule the world. The concentration of wealth and power of corporations that own most of this resource-intensive technology and the environmental price tag of AI can only hasten climate change. In response to these ethical problems, a number of research centres are now investing in the intersection of humanities and AI in order to study its impact on society, notably the Schwarzman College for Computing at MIT, the Schwartz Reisman Institute for Technology and Society at the University of Toronto, and The Schwarzman Centre’s Institute for Ethics in AI at Oxford. An article about the MIT initiative noted: “The approach has the potential not just to diversify tech but to help ‘techify’ everything else” while Geoffrey Hinton said: “My hope is that the Schwartz Reisman Institute will be the place where deep learning disrupts the humanities.” What these statements disavow, however, are the very different epistemological approaches that structure these fields. If we are to begin to deal with the ethical issues of AI, the humanities should not be “disrupted” and made to bow to the logic of big data, algorithms, and machines. In this talk, I will argue that it is only by keeping alive the tensions between artificial intelligence and the humanities that we can hope to have an informed debate about the limits and possibilities of this technology.

For more information see Ethics of AI Lab, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

The Real Life ‘Ex Machina’ Is Here

Posted: April 23, 2019 by keasp1 in AI, Events, Film, Robots
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ss4_poster_finalTeresa Heffernan will present “The Real Life ‘Ex Machina’ Is Here: Restoring the Gap between Science and Fiction” at the Machine Agencies Speakers Series on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 from 3 to 5 pm. Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology, Concordia University, 1515 Rue Sainte-Catherine W. EV Building, 11.455. Montréal, Quebec. For more information: www.facebook.com/events/1001883676675274/

 

keasp photo Big Think Nov14,2018The Big Thinking public panel on the social implications of AI, held at the Halifax Public Library on November 14, was a lively and well attended event. The discussants included Teresa Heffernan, Ian Kerr, Fuyuki Kurasawa and Duncan MacIntosh, with Howard Ramos (Dalhousie) as moderator.  Courtney Law provides a sense of the event here, noting for example that Teresa Heffernan “reminded the audience that AI and humans are inextricably linked because AI is built on data created by humans” and that “we sometimes assume ‘fauxtonomy’ when it comes to AI, attributing more complexity to machinery than it is due because we are influenced by fictional representations.” The event was sponsored by Dalhousie University, the Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities (SSHRC), and the Halifax Public Library.

SSHRC has published a video recording of the entire event that you can view below or access here.

llwlYou are invited to join Teresa Heffernan (Saint Mary’s University), Ian Kerr (U of Ottawa), Fuyuki Kurasawa (York U) and Duncan MacIntosh (Dalhousie) for a panel discussion on ‘the potential social impacts of artificial intelligence and the role humanities and social sciences will play in identifying the legal, ethical and policy issues we should start considering today.’

Where: Paul O’Regan Hall, Halifax Public Library Central

When: Wednesday, November 14, 2018. 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

Moderated  by Gabriel Miller, Executive Director, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The event is sponsored by Dalhousie University (Offices of the President and the Vice-President Research, plus the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences, Computer Science, Law, and Management), the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences and the Halifax Public Libraries.

The event will be free and open to the public with a reception to follow.

Questions? Contact fassalum@dal.ca

Join the Facebook event.

halconTeresa Heffernan, professor of English at Saint Mary’s University, will give a talk at the upcoming HAL-CON science fiction, fantasy and gaming convention, a massive multi-format event attended by some 9,200 people in 2017.

Dr. Heffernan’s talk, “Fiction Meets Science: Ex Machina, Artificial Intelligence and the Robotics Industry,” is scheduled for 6:15 pm, Friday, October 26, 2018.  Location: Room 502, Ballroom level 5 at the Halifax Convention Centre — 1650 Argyle Street, Halifax, NS. For information and tickets go to HAL-CON.com.

ABSTRACT: The conflation of AI and fiction in the cultural imaginary helps to drive the fantasy aspect of the robotics/AI industry that encourages the view that there is no difference between a computing machine and a human. If fiction offers an exploration and interrogation of the shifting terrain of what it means to be human, the industry’s overly literal readings of fiction fetishize the technology, strip it of its cultural and historical context, and claim it for the here and now. While the industry exploits fiction to help animate machines and bring them to “life” in the name of a certain technological future, it erases the “fictiveness” of the fiction that keeps open the question of the future and what it means to be human.

My talk–“Fiction Meets Science: Ex Machina, Artificial Intelligence and the Robotics Industry”–will argue that we need to restore the gap between the literary and scientific imaginings of AI and robots. Resisting literal readings of fiction, it considers the ways in which metaphors shape our reading of humans and other animals. For instance, in the field of AI, rather than the computer serving as a metaphor for the brain, the brain has come to serve as a metaphor for the computer. The film Ex Machina, as a modern day Frankenstein story, exposes the consequences of this metaphor that reduces humans to computing machines that in turn entraps them in an algorithmic logic under corporate control. In this film, it is not Ava, the programmed machine, that is the subject of the experiment, but rather Caleb who finds himself locked in the robot lab by the end of the story.

StephanieDickDr. Stephanie Dick (Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania) is scheduled to give a public lecture this Wednesday, April 4th at 7 pm on the changing notion of “the human” in artificial intelligence research.

Title: Making Up Minds: Thinking With, About and For Humans

Abstract: The notion of the “human” has changed in Artificial Intelligence research. Where “traditional” A.I. sought to explicitly reproduce human faculties in machines, today any resemblance is incidental to the primary goal of making good predictions or solving hard problems.

Time and Place: 7:00 pm, Wednesday, April 4th, 2018 at Alumni Hall, University of King’s College, Halifax.

For more information: Automatons: From Ovid to AI

Steph Dick Poster PRINT-min