Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Un policy brief 1Killer robots. Slaughterbots. Lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS).  How are they changing international norms of warfare, peace and security? What does it mean for us? How concerned should we be?

These questions are the subject of a debate between Dr. Noel Sharkey, professor of A.I. and robotics (Sheffield), renowned BBC commentator on robotics and A.I., and Chair of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, and Dr. Duncan MacIntosh,  professor of philosophy at Dalhousie University.

When: 7:00 pm, Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

Where: The Scotia Bank Auditorium (Sobey Business School building, Saint Mary’s University).

This public event is part of the “Automatons! From Ovid to AI” King’s College lecture series. It is co-sponsored by Saint Mary’s University and the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Public Affair.

POSTER War in the Age of Intell Machines A Deabte (Feb 28)

 

 

 

Don’t miss this debate!

Dr. Noel Sharkey, emeritus professor of artificial intelligence and robotics at the University of Sheffield, renowned BBC commentator on robotics and A.I., and the Chair of the “International Committee for Robot Arms Control”, will debate Dalhousie’s Duncan MacIntosh on the nature, ethics and future of “Autonomous Weapons and War in the Age of Intelligent Machines”.

The public event is co-sponsored by Saint Mary’s University and the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Public Affairs and will be taking place in  7:00pm, Wednesday, March 21st.

Simon talk 2As part of the Automatons public lecture series, Dr. Simon Kow will give a talk on “Asian Robots and Orientalism” this Wednesday (7:00 pm, March 7th) at Alumni Hall, King’s College (Halifax).

Abstract: “This talk examines aspects of the history of East Asian robots and Orientalism from the early modern period to the present, including the image of the automaton in western Orientalist views of Asian societies, the influences  of Asian and especially Japanese cultural traditions on Asian approaches to robots, and ways in which certain depictions of robots in contemporary Japanese popular culture can be interpreted in terms of a counter-Orientalist narrative on technology.”

For more information go to the Automatons Lecture Series.

Simon talk 1

Dawn talk 3What do puppeteers mean when they speak about bringing a puppet ‘to life’? What is the difference between a prop and a puppet? Why do these questions matter not only in the creative arts but also in the study of how artificial intelligence and automatons are imagined? Dr. Dawn Brandes (Fountain School of Performing Arts and Halifax Humanities) will be exploring these questions in her talk this Wednesday, Feb 28th, 7:00pm at Alumni Hall, King’s College, Halifax. This talk is part of the public lecture series “Automatons: From Ovid to AI.” For information go to: Automatons Lecture Series.

 

Public lecture on Artificial Intelligence

Posted: February 12, 2018 by keasp1 in AI, Ethics, Events, Science

On Wednesday February 14th, Stan Matwin (Dalhousie University) will give a public lecture on the technical, ethical and philosophical issues associated with artificial intelligence (AI). His talk will be followed by a response from Teresa Heffernan (Saint Mary’s University).

Part of the “Automatons: From Ovid to AI” lecture series, this public event is scheduled for 7:00 pm, February 14th, at Alumni Hall, King’s College, Halifax.

Matwin 5

Ancient Automatons Lecture

Posted: January 22, 2018 by keasp1 in Education, Events, Fiction, Robots, Technology

Courtney Ann Roby, Associate Professor, Cornell University will give a talk on ancient automatons this Thursday (7:00 pm January 25th) at Alumni Hall, University of King’s College, Halifax. Dr. Roby is the author of Technical Ekphrasis in Greek and Roman Science and Literature: The Written Machine between Alexandria and Rome (2016) and Hero of Alexandria (forthcoming).

Abstract: Hero of Alexandria, known for his works on topics from theoretical mechanics to catapult design, describes his theatrical automata as the culmination of mechanics. This lecture will introduce these automata and the mechanisms that drove them, consider what it means to think of “programming” in terms of concrete materials rather than as abstractions of bits and bytes, and trace the cultural value of Hero’s automata from the Roman world to the Renaissance.

heffernan-poster-3-1-e1516029997438.jpgNews headlines, government reports, scientific journals, and museums often use fiction to frame discussions of the robotics and artificial intelligence industry, implying a direct trajectory between the fiction and the science. Yet when it comes to real-world policies, the literary imagination is marginalized in discussions of a technological future with the oft-voiced argument that we need to keep the “fiction” out of science. There are all sorts of ways in which fiction and art more generally are mobilized in the service of the robotics/AI industry in order to prove the “creativity” and autonomy of artificial intelligence; what gets shut down, however, is the critical potential of art. Resisting the tendency to read science as fiction coming true, Teresa Heffernan will consider the very different ways science and fiction imagine robots, artificial intelligence, and technological futures.

When/Where: 7:00 PM, January 17 at Alumni Hall, University of King’s College, Halifax.

Information: www.ukings.ca/automatons

 

AutomatonsSeriesPoster-668x1024Starting January 10th, 2018, the University of King’s College, Halifax, is hosting an exciting public lecture series, Automatons! From Ovid to AI, on the culture, science and politics of robots and AI. The series begins with a screening of Fritz Lang’s 1927 classic film, Metropolis, with live musical accompaniment by the Upstream Music Association. Talks will be given by international scholars and authors such as Stephanie Dick (Of Models and Machines), Despina Kakoudaki (Anatomy of a Robot: Literature, Cinema and the Cultural Work of Artificial People), and Courtney Ann Roby (The Written Machine between Alexandria and Rome). Renowned physicist and commentator Noel Sharkey is scheduled to debate the issue of “fully autonomous weapons systems” with Dalhousie University philosophy professor Duncan MacIntoshTeresa Heffernan, Saint Mary’s University English professor and director of the Social Robot Futures project, will open the series with an introductory lecture on robot imaginaries past and future.

The schedule of talks and events is presented below. More information on each talk can be found at Automatons! From Ovid to AI.

All lectures start at 7 p.m. and take place in Alumni Hall, University of King’s College, Halifax, except for the March 21 and March 28 events.


January 10: Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis”Fritz Lang’s classic 1927 film, Metropolis, with live electroacoustic music, opens the Public Lecture Series. Venue: Alumni Hall

With musical accompaniment by the Upstream Music Association, the screening explores the intersection between electronics and improvisation, automation and real-time inspiration, featuring some of our finest cinematic improvisors: Amy Brandon on guitar and electronics, Steven Naylor on keyboard and electronics, Lukas Pearse on bass and electronics, and Brandon Auger on synthesizer.

January 17: Imagining Automatons

Teresa Heffernan of Saint Mary’s University and Director of the “Social Robots Futures” project, delivers the opening lecture on the past and future of robots. Venue: Alumni Hall

January 25: Ancient Automatons

Courtney Ann Roby, Cornell University, and author of The Written Machine between Alexandria and Rome (2016). Venue: Alumni Hall

February 14: Panel discussion on “Big Data and Autonomous Vehicles”

With Brian Flemming, Senior Fellow with the Van Horne Institute, Calgary, and Stan Matwin, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair, Dalhousie University. Venue: Alumni Hall

February 28: Imagined Puppet Life

Dawn Brandes, University of King’s College and Halifax Humanities. Venue: Alumni Hall

March 7: Asian Robots & Orientalism

Simon Kow, University of King’s College. Venue: Alumni Hall

March 21: War in the Age of Intelligent Machines

Renowned physicist and commentator Noel Sharkey debates Duncan MacIntosh, Dalhousie University, on the role of autonomous weapons. Venue: Scotiabank Auditorium, Saint Mary’s University

March 28: Frankenstein

A special performance and lecture marking the 200th anniversary of the Mary Shelley classic

With Despina Kakoudaki, American University of Washington, and author of Anatomy of a Robot: Literature, Cinema and the Cultural Work of Artificial People. Venue: Fountain School of Performing Arts, Dalhousie University

April 4: Living Artificially

With King’s alumna and University of Pennsylvania professor, Stephanie Dick. Author of Of Models and Machines

The 2018 Lecture Series is made possible with assistance from the University of King’s College (Contemporary Studies Program, Early Modern Studies Program and History of Science and Technology Program), Dalhousie University and Saint Mary’s University.